Latin America adventures: The difference between private and group tours


Latin America adventures: The difference between private and group tours

hiking the Inca TrailMake new memories on an epic adventure to South America!
Photo by Anthony S.

Taking a tour, paired with some free time to explore, is the best way to learn more about the local culture and history of the places you visit in Latin America. Some travelers associate the word “tour” with large groups of 40+ people that ride around in big buses. Our team at Latin America For Less wants travelers to avoid this type of impersonal experience, which is why our expert travel advisors specialize in organizing private and small group tours.

Private Tours: A customized experience

On a private tour, you and your travel companions have the undivided attention of your own guide. The start time for each tour is flexible (as long as it works with the opening hours of attractions) and the schedule can be tailored to satisfy specific interests.

“A private tour can absolutely be customized based on a traveler’s own preferences. On a Sacred Valley Tour, for example, it’s possible to visit the Cochahuasi Animal Sanctuary upon request, although this stop is not normally included in the group tour,” said Matt Greenberg, Latin America For Less’ Sales Manager.

family visit to Machu Picchu in PeruPlan a memorable Machu Picchu experience with your family.
Photo by Robyn H.

Matt continued to explain the benefits of a customized tour experience. “Visiting Machu Picchu on a private tour with your family is really different from taking a group tour. The whole experience is catered to you, and all of the guide’s attention is on you and your questions.

Private tours can be organized in Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Chile, and Ecuador by Latin America For Less travel advisors. For some destinations, private tours are arranged to ensure that clients aren’t put in a really large group where two or more languages are spoken.

Small Group Tours: In company of like-minded travelers

Group tours are a great way to mix and mingle with like-minded travelers. While group tours don’t allow the same flexibility as private tours, both options are led by friendly, knowledgeable guides that enhance your appreciation of the places you visit.

Peru For Less, a branch of Latin America For Less, has two full-time guides: Fabricio Ortiz, our star Machu Picchu guide; and  Fabricio Ochoa, our popular Cusco/Sacred Valley guide. Both guides are passionate about their work and continuously receive raving reviews in testimonials from our travelers.  A group tour of Cusco led by guide Fabricio Ochoa averages between 6-8 people for high season (May through October) and 4-5 people for low season (January through March).

Explore the AmazonCompare and share travel stories with those on your group tour.
Photo by Daniela Ellerbeck

Latin America For Less works with trusted providers that operate quality, small group tours in cities and to natural wonders throughout South America. For more information about a specific small group tour (maximum of 15 -20 people), talk with an expert travel advisor.

From a price-point, if you’re traveling in a group of 6+ people, the cost of doing a private tour is not going to be much different than a group tour. But for a group of 2 people, the price of doing a group tour versus booking a private tour is more economical.

The benefits of booking your Peru tour early

You can receive an upgrade to a private tour free of charge when booking your adventure to Peru. Learn more about the Early Bird Special now!  For help booking your own tours, talk with a travel advisor today.

Related Post:
Latin America For Less offers free travel insurance


About Author

Britt is addicted to the spontaneous nature of travel and personal growth it inspires. She bought a one-way ticket to South America in 2012, starting her journey in Argentina and slowly traveled north through Chile, Bolivia, and Peru. Unable to shake her addiction of Latin America, she now happily calls Peru home.

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