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Lima Restaurant Guide


SAVOR PERUVIAN FOOD, ONE BITE AT A TIME

Glossary


From fusion to traditional, seafood to vegetarian, world class to casual and everywhere in between, the diversity of Lima’s food scene is impressive and equally yummy. The number of trendy restaurants in the city has exploded and today Lima is considered the gastronomic capital of Latin America.

This edition of Sense Peru shines the light on the burgeoning food scene in Lima. Learn about the regional dishes from around the country, unique culinary experiences, and don’t miss out on downloading a free copy of our 2020 Lima Restaurant Guide.

You’ll discover - if you haven’t already - that “What’s your favorite Peruvian dish?” is not an easy question to answer. There are just so many good options to choose from.

Peruvian Gastronomy


Variety is the spice of life.

For Peruvians, food is so much more than sustenance - it is not only an enormous point of pride, but a uniting emblem celebrating the cultural and geographic diversity of their country. This pride is merited, hence why the delightful flavors of Peruvian cuisine are famed around the globe.

Within Peru’s borders exist a desert coastline, towering Andean peaks, and lush Amazon rainforest. Such landscape diversity gives access to an unprecedented selection of natural bounty and homegrown produce used to prepare spectacular varieties of food.

Creative fusion is a staple of Peruvian cooking. The unique marriage of local and international flavors is influenced at large from immigration to Peru from European and Asian countries in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While these immigrants adapted their lifestyles to local living, they also influenced Peruvian culture over the decades, especially in the kitchen, where the melting pot metaphor comes to life via extraordinary combinations of traditions and flavors that characterize the fusion of so much of the national cuisine.

Lima Restaurant Guide


Find the perfect spot to curb your hunger.

The 2020 edition of our Lima Restaurant Guide is filled with recommendations from our Peru for Less team members that live and work in the city. Inside you’ll find details of restaurants, cafes, and bars for any occasion.

Blogpost Icon Best Affordable Restaurants in Lima, Peru
Blogpost Icon Lima's Best Upscale Restaurants
Lima Restaurant Guide Preview

Download your FREE electronic copy now!


  • Browse 9 dining out categories.

  • Short descriptions let you easily compare options.

  • Gluten-Free options are indicated.

  • Star icon showcases award winning restaurants.

  • “Off The Radar” picks are local favorites.

Taste of Peru


Diversity is the name of the game.

+ Peruvian Dishes and Ingredients

The names of Peruvian dishes on restaurant menus may not always be enough to decipher whether it’s what you want to eat or not. Take a staple of local cuisine, the potato. Papa is the Spanish word for potato. You may see Papa a la Huancaina on the menu, so you anticipate potatoes in the order, but the tail end of the dish name leaves you scratching your head. Is Huancaina a piece of meat? Maybe it’s a specific type of potato?

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Browse Photo Collage


Each image depicts an iconic Peruvian dish, drink or dessert.

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Click Photo


Each image is accompanied by a description.

Food from Amazon, Peru

Jungle

Chifa Rice Food Peru

Chifa

Alfajores Food Peru

Alfajores

Papa a la Huancaína Food Peru

Papa a la Huancaína

Pisco Sour Drink Peru

Pisco Sour

Lomo Saltado Food Peru

Lomo Saltado

Lucuma Ice cream Food Peru

Lúcuma Ice Cream

Causa Food Peru

Causa

Anticuchos Food Peru

Anticuchos

Potato Food Peru

Potato

Chicha Morada Drink Peru

Chicha Morada

Arroz Con Pollo Food Peru

Arroz con Pollo

Ceviche Food Peru

Ceviche

Inka Kola Drink Peru

Inka Kola

Fusion Food Peru

Fusion

Aji de Gallina Food Peru

Ají de Gallina

Chilcano Drink Peru

Chiclano

Pollo a la Brasa Food Peru

Pollo a la Brasa

+ Lima Food Tours

“Michelle and I describe our Dinner & Show experience at Hacienda Dpaso and share some additional advice in the Q&A.”

Blogpost Icon Cultural Dinner Show in Lima Review

“...Lima, the bustling capital of Peru, with its imposing size and cacophony of traffic, is perhaps unmatched in its ability to sustain a way of life that centers on tradition and locally sourced ingredients.”

Blogpost Icon Exploring Lima: One Pedal, One Bite at a Time

“When the opportunity to join Lima Gourmet on their Evening Tour popped up, it was an offer I couldn’t pass up!”

Blogpost Icon Peruvian Cuisine: A Lima Gourmet Tour

Eating Out Tips


Peru’s gastronomic scene will definitely rank among the highlights of your time in the vibrant capital city.

Tipping


How much should I tip?

  • At a nice, sit down restaurant it’s customary to tip 10% of the bill total for good service. Some upscale dining establishments include a service change in the bill.
  • At a cafe or casual eatery leaving a few soles tip is normal where you sit down for a quick bite to eat.
  • At a bar or lounge, a good rule of thumb is to tip 1 sole (about 35 cents) per drink.

  • How should I tip?

    Leaving a cash tip in soles (Peru’s national currency) is the most popular way to tip restaurant staff. As tempting as it may be to tip in USD, it’s actually more of a burden for the recipient(s) to change that to local currency. Some nicer sit down restaurants give you the option to add a tip when paying with a bank card, but this is not the norm.

    Taxi Service


    Many dining options in the city’s tourist frequented districts (like Miraflores and Barranco) are within walking distance of hotels or hostels. If taking a taxi is the best option for you, using Uber is a convenient way to get around Lima or the hotel reception can help you arrange a safe taxi to pick you up.

    Taxis in Peru do not have meters and prices are negotiated before getting into the car. It’s not customary to tip your taxi driver.

    Dress Code


    Did you forget to bring your suit and tie? You couldn’t squeeze in your pair of heels when you were re-packing your bag? You’re in luck. For the most part, restaurants and dining establishments in Lima and the rest of Peru do not have a dress code. At most, we would recommend that you wear casual elegant attire for restaurants that we have categorized as upscale (e.g. Central, Maido, Astrid y Gaston, etc). The same also goes for certain lounges and bars such as Cala in Barranco.

    Mealtime


    Breakfast Peru

    Breakfast


    This is typically a simple meal, including some assortment of bread, jam, and cheese with coffee or juice.


    7am-9am

    Look for desayuno americano (American breakfast) on a breakfast menu if you’re really hungry and looking for something really filling. This option typically comes with eggs cooked to your liking, bread, jam, butter, and coffee or juice.

    Lunch Peru

    Lunch


    This is the main meal of the day for many Peruvians.


    1pm-3pm

    Signs outside marketing “El Menu” is referencing a lunch menu. It’s a good budget-friendly meal. For a set price you usually get a starter, main course, dessert, and drink.

    Afternoon Snacks Peru

    Afternoon Snack


    Some Peruvians eat a small meal, called lonche, to curb their hunger before dinnertime.


    5:30pm

    Eating a simple sandwich or tamale is typical.

    Dinner Peru

    Dinner


    Dishes served for dinner in many Peruvian households is generally lighter than lunch options.


    8pm-10pm

    Getting dinner reservations at popular restaurants can be difficult after 8pm. Be sure to plan ahead!

    Look for desayuno americano (American breakfast) on a breakfast menu if you’re really hungry and looking for something really filling. This option typically comes with eggs cooked to your liking, bread, jam, butter, and coffee or juice.

    Signs outside marketing “El Menu” is referencing a lunch menu. It’s a good budget-friendly meal. For a set price you usually get a starter, main course, dessert, and drink.

    Eating a simple sandwich or tamale is typical.

    Getting dinner reservations at popular restaurants can be difficult after 8pm. Be sure to plan ahead!

    Sense Peru Lima Restaurant Guide Edition

      SENSE PERU

      Lima Restaurant Guide


    • PUBLISHER: Peru for Less
    • CONTENT CREATION: Britt Fracolli
    • FEATURED GUESTS:Andres Miró Quesada, Michelle Talsma, and Monique Loayza, Peru for Less
    • DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Clement Taquet
    • LAST UPDATED: March 2019

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